An interpretation of invictus a poem by william ernest henley

Henley wrote the poem to encourage himself in the face of the deadly illness which tried to steal his life. Penlighten Staff Power of a Poem During his internment at Robben Island, former South African president and Nobel Laureate Nelson Mandela said it was 'Invictus' that inspired him and kept him going throughout his years of imprisonment and suffering.

He will always listen to his inner conscience and is ready to face all opposition. This is the gate that leads to the heavenly life. The speaker is coming out of a period of total darkness, a hell. Henley was very sick as a young boy, which later resulted in him contracting an infection that spread to his leg.

Written in and published in it retains its original power and conviction. Stevenson later admitted that he had based his character Long John Silver - from the book Treasure Island - on Henley, he having a wooden leg, a strong rasping voice and a forceful personality.

Little wonder that many famous and many unknown people over the years have used the inspiration of this poem to help them face personal trials and tribulations.

How does the poem relate to you? He was diagnosed with tuberculosis, which deteriorated further, requiring amputation of one of his legs.

These last two lines are considered to be some of the most famous lines in all of literature, and they are a continued source of inspiration for people of all walks of life. He was an English poet who lived within — He managed to save his right leg by refusing surgery and seeking an alternative form of treatment from a Scottish doctor, James Lister.

The speaker implies that their unconquerable soul is a gift from a godly realm. And this very thought has been beautifully encapsulated into words by English poet William Ernest Henley.

There is strong assonance - use of repeated vowels: Throughout it all, however, he perseveres and is successful in his endeavors. He lifted his spirits, and along with the efforts of the doctor, proved that nothing is impossible if you decide to work on it patiently.

Invictus does contain passion and defiance and it is easy to see just why so many use the powerful lines to drum up courage and to shed light into the darker corners when all else fails. The future cannot be seen. Times may be dark, the fates against you, but you know what? It's not quite prayer but it is grateful thanks.

The nautical imagery once again returns in this stanza, with the speaker referring to himself as a captain, but also commenting that it does not matter how narrow the path is to the gates of the afterlife, he will make it with no problems.

To sum up the entire poem, the last lines say it all: The poet certainly knew hard times and needed all his strength to battle against disease.

Invictus by W.E. Henley

He will always listen to his inner conscience and is ready to face all opposition. One can use it to withstand the vicissitudes and challenges of life.

He had had the disease since he was very young, and his foot had been amputated shortly before he wrote the poem. The second stanza is a continuation of the first. Conversely, the second line is an inference to the depths of hell - the punishments being the sins written down during a lifetime.

Joseph Listerthe developer of antiseptic medicine. The poem itself is very simple in form and devices, and as such comes as a relief in a time where flowery and ambiguous writing ran wild. The poem also has a set rhythm: This beautiful piece of poetry goes something like this.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds, and shall find, me unafraid. This is similar in feeling to the idea of St John of the Cross, the Spanish mystic, writing in the 16th century of 'the dark night of the soul', where the human spirit has lost its normal confident, self-assured status.

Although the poem doesn't explicitly mention christianity, there is a sense that this opening line is rooted in religiousness. He faces each challenge with courage and is not afraid, and he is able to surmount any hardship.

In fact, the speaker has been unafraid throughout the ordeal, which has lasted years, and will continue to show a brave face.Nov 18,  · Invictus, meaning "unconquerable" or "undefeated" in Latin, is a poem by William Ernest funkiskoket.com poem was written while Henley was.

Analysis of Invictus Invictus is a four stanza rhyming poem in iambic tetrameter, that is, with four beats or stresses in each line. Occasional spondees occur to sharpen up this steady rhythm.

Invictus By William Ernest Henley About this Poet Born in Gloucester, England, poet, editor, and critic William Ernest Henley was educated at Crypt Grammar School, where he studied with the poet T.E.

Brown, and the University of St.

Analysis of Poem

Andrews. His father was a struggling bookseller who died when Henley. Invictus by William Ernest Henley. Out of the night that covers me Black as the Pit from pole to pole I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of/5(). Analysis of Invictus Invictus is a four stanza rhyming poem in iambic tetrameter, that is, with four beats or stresses in each line. Occasional spondees occur to sharpen up this steady rhythm.

Here is an analysis of W.E. Henley’s famous and inspiration poem, Invictus. It is said that William Ernest Henley wrote the poem in for a Scottish flour merchant named Robert Thomas Hamilton Bruce. It was first published n —without a title—in Henley’s first volume of poetry.

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An interpretation of invictus a poem by william ernest henley
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